Interview with Nerry: “I’m the voice of the oppression we faced from the Government for years.”

Hailing from Westmoreland (Jamaica) Nerada Brissette, known with the stage name of Nerry, has been around since the mid-90s and performed at most of Jamaica’s major music festivals. Nerry not only sings, he’s also a player of various instruments. But there is no other instrument close to him than the “bass”, according to Nerry’s personal opinion. He’s currently working on his first album, which he is producing as his solo debut entitled “Call Me Nerry”. The singer toured in Europe, to be exact in Germany and Austria, back in 2008 with Freddie McGregor. He’s been touring the USA since the beginning of the pandemic early this year. Nerry is the perfect representation of reggae music and its demands. He maintains an authentic sound and never fails to captivate his audience. His soulful, smooth and raspy vocals are rarely heard those days. His last single “Babylon have the nerve” featuring Gentleman and Freddie McGregor is actually getting a great forward all over the World. We have interviewed him.

Gege Vibes: How did u approach to your musical journey?

Nerry: Music is in my blood as long as my father is also a singer and a player of instruments. It all started singing in church, where I also learnt to play different musical instruments. In the high school I sang with a group called “Soul 4 Soul” then I started singing at the hotels and at the end in the concerts.

GV: It was a long race. What do you think is the biggest result you actually achieved during your artistic career? 

N: The greatest thing I’ve achieved is the vocal respect I got wherever I performed and also the immaculate comparison I get between other great international vocalists. It’s an honour for me.

GV: You are a reggae singer. Why in your opinion is it important for the new generations to keep doing reggae music? 

N: Throughout the years reggae has been the best way to uplift spirits. Personally, it means the expression of myself to the fullest. That’s why the new generations need to keep this musical genre alive. I believe the whole World gravitates around reggae music.

GV: What’s the message beside your new successful single ‘Babylon have the nerve’ featuring Freddie McGregor and Gentleman?

N: The message in this song is all about the oppression we face for years from the Government in terms of legalization of Marijuana.

GV: I could feel this topic really touchd you. What are other topics you prefer singing about?

I don’t really have a favorite topic. I just write and create what comes to my mind depending on the way it makes me feel.

GV: Are you planning to release any album and in general what are your future projects?

N: I have an EP ready and we were setting up to release it in December 2020 along with two album release parties but the whole plan got delayed due to the corona pandemic. It’s a 6 track album titled “Call me NERRY” though. My team also realized 4 official videoclips out of the six tracks that I will be launch online very soon.

Eugenia Conti

Interview with I-Taweh: “My dream is to live long and healthy to see the unification of this human race”

Donavan I-taweh Cunningham was born in the hills of St. Ann, the same parish in Jamaica where the great Marcus Garvey, Burning Spear and Bob Marley all rise from. Like most successful artists, he comes from humble beginnings. Raised in the farming community of Prickly Pole, he spent most of his childhood farming alongside his father and four brothers. As a young child he played music on handmade instruments crafted together from bamboo and sardine tins.
It was the move to Kingston in 1992 that jump-started his musical career. Living between the communities of Mall Road, Grants Pen, Portmore, Rockfort, and Duhaney Park, I-taweh found comfort in the ghetto at the Community Center of The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari.

This was extremely influential for his music and his mission, where he was amongst some of the greatest musicians in the industry including Dizzy Johnny Moore, Earl Chinna Smith, Nambo Robinson, and Bongo Herman. During this time he was rarely seen without his guitar, and was given the nickname Danny Gitz. Along with the name, his skills and reputation as a musician began to grow, until the legendary Sugar Minott took him under his wing as his guitarist and harmony singer.

In 1998, I-taweh became the youngest member of The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari, Jamaica’s most influential Nyahbingi, religious and cultural group. With Brother Sam Clayton as the leader, they toured Europe extensively until 2007 presenting traditional Jamaican music and educational workshops.
I-taweh produced and composed his first solo album, Overload, which he released in 2011. He has since gone one to self-produce two more albums, Judgementwhich was released in February 2017, and his latest project, Reload, released on January 3rd, 2020.  He is currently promoting his new single “One too many” that is denouncing the brutality of police against black people in the World. He composed this tune after the tragedy of George Floyd, happened in USA. The Artist underlines that every human being deserves the same justice and human rights otherwise there will be never any peace without any justice.

1. As many great artists you came from modest origins. Could you explain us how did you approach to your musical journey in the first place? 
I started out in a tiny community called Prickly Pole. It’s in St Ann Parrish, Jamaica, just a few miles from the home where Bob Marley grew in Nine Mile. My first real musical approach was playing in the church of my community.
2. Who are your biggest artistic inspirations? 
I would say The Wailers and Kenny Rodgers.
3. You’re a Rastaman. Could you tell us something more about the tour u did in Europe in 2007 to educate people to this culture? How it was the feedback here so far?
 Yah man. I’m proudly a Rastaman. The tours I did in Europe were very good for me especially because I got the chance to visit new places, to meet new people to share my vibrations and Reggae music with.
4. Your last project ‘Reload’ was released on January 3rd. How was working at this project with your team?

My latest album “Reload” was released in the beginning of this year, was a very good experience for me putting it together, I wanna give thanks to all who was there with me for the ride. This album is I-Taweh’s greatest body of work-to-date.

All songs are composed, written, and produced by myself through my independent label Tap Nat Muzik.
5. Do the topics inside your albums reflect any of the main dream of your life? 
The main dream of my life is to live long and healthy to see the unification of this human race. I tried my best to express this message through my latest album.
6. Do you believe in the power of conscious music as a privileged way to give universal messages then? Why in your opinion is important that younger artists keep some great values of the past? 
Yes, I do believe in conscious positive vibes. Since I was a little boy ’till now it’s being a positive uplifting force in my life. Today I’m in a point that hopefully I can reach some young minds and souls with my music.
7. Any Future project as soon as everything will return back to normal?
Well, I am always working on projects, the inspirations keeps flowing which I’m thankful for… so I am constantly in the studio recording new songs. I’ll soon update you.
8. Could you give a special greetings for Gege Vibes Magazine readers?
Eugenia Conti

Intervista con F.U.L.A./ Dal Senegal un esempio di resilienza che ci insegna il valore del multiculturalismo

Classe 1993, F.U.L.A., al secolo Oumar Sall, è un italo-senegalese, ultimo di 12 figli. Arriva in Italia a sette mesi con la madre, fuggendo dalla propria patria. Cresce in Calabria, diviso tra la famiglia affidataria e la madre biologica Fatima. Multiformità e Multiculturalismo rappresentano i concetti integranti della sua evoluzione umana e musicale: dalle radici della musica africana agli intenti dei vari cultori Blues, Soul, Reggae, Rap, Jazz, Pop e Rock.“La mia Africa richiama gli aspetti rudimentali della vita, i sentimenti primi e immutabili dell’essere umano, come la gioia e la nostalgia”, dichiara.

Oumar racconta il suo vissuto traducendolo in tematiche oggettive nelle quali ognuno possa riconoscersi e rispecchiarsi. “Nelle mie canzoni si ritrovano spensieratezza consapevole e voglia di rivalsa perenne”, ci spiega.
F.u.l.a. può essere collocato in un ampio movimento culturale ed artistico come quello dell’Afro-Punk. Fra le varie esperienze, ha partecipato all’attivismo nelle università italiane con il “Festival delle Generazioni” ed al programma TV “Siamo Noi” su TV 200 per lo “Ius Soli” nel 2019. Nel 2020 Oumar firma un contratto discografico con l’indie label “La Pop”. Inoltre, prende parte al progetto di crew “Equipe 54” collaborando con alcuni artisti come Tommy Kuti, Yank Real e Slim Gong. 3 mesi fa è uscito il suo singolo ufficiale “Maldafrica”, che ha riscosso un ottimo feedback online.

Lo abbiamo intervistato per voi…

 

Come è stato il tuo approccio con l’Italia e l’integrazione in questa Nazione?
Non è stato traumatico. Sono cresciuto in provincia in un paesino di pochi abitanti in cui eravamo gli unici neri. La gente del paese ormai mi vuole bene, anche se ho dovuto lottare contro alcune menti becere ed un po’ di discriminazione subdola. Ad ogni modo sono sempre riuscito a farmi rispettare.
Hai origini africane. Quanto le tue radici hanno influito anche sul tuo stile musicale e sulla realizzazione della tua carriera?
L’Africa influenza ogni singolo artista o genere musicale. Quando si parla di musica moderna, spesso, tralasciamo che le origini della stessa provengono dall’Africa. Nel mio caso è ancora più evidente.
Quando hai capito che volessi fare musica in maniera professionale come lavoro e non solo come passione?
In realtà è stato da sempre il mio obiettivo. Da piccolino guardavo Michael Jackson in Tv e ripetevo a mia madre che un giorno sarei diventato come lui. (Ride)
Progetti futuri dopo gli ultimi singoli che hai lanciato online? Hai in cantiere anche un album?
Il mio progetto futuro è riuscire a far musica ogni giorno con costanza e dedizione. Solo dopo potrò pensare ad un disco e ad altri progetti. Nel mentre, però, credo che faremo uscire qualche Ep e parallelamente sto lavorando con il mio collettivo Equipe 54 a molte canzoni.
Quali sono le tematiche più presenti nei testi delle tue canzoni?
Mi piace variare con i topics perché racconto sempre la mia vita. Non ci sono tematiche specifiche nelle mie canzoni: dipende dalle mie esperienze e da cosa vuole comunicare la mia anima in un determinato momento.
Sei stato definito un esempio di resilienza. Potresti spiegare a tutti il perché?
Probabilmente perché non mi sono mai tirato indietro nella vita, anche quando tutto va male  non perdo mai la voglia di sorridere e di mettermi in gioco. Non mi piace vivere per nulla. La resilienza è uno status mentale, difficile da attuare ma soddisfacente.
Sogno più grande che hai per il futuro?
Vedere l’Africa davvero decolonizzata.
Eugenia Conti

Interview with Walshy Fire: “Whatever platform I’m getting, I try my best to bring my Jamaican culture along with me”.

We interviewed Leighton Paul Walsh, better known by his stage name Walshy Fire via Skype. Grammy Award Winning Jamaican American DJ, MC and producer, Walshy Fire had so many memories to share with us. His musical journey is very long and full of accomplishments. He started with his first sound called Change Disco when he was 18, then he continued to play with CoppershotBlack Chiney and 9 years ago he started his prolific union with the brand Major Lazer. This collaboration made him travel all over the World smashing up every single place. He used a mainstream formula to promote jamaican sonorities and that’s the key of his huge success. Walshy Fire would like to see a different highlight for Jamaican artists internationally like it’s happening right now with his ward Koffee. Not by chance, he got the Grammy to produce her major hit “Toast”.

Walshy Fire with Koffee in Usa (contributed)

 

Walshy produced a whole lot of music and riddims in his career featuring Artists such us Chronixx, Kabaka PyramidCocoa Tea and many more. Right now, he is focused on the online business due the Covid-19 emergency advertising his format “Quarantine Clash”, together with Warrior Sound, to teach more about the soundclash culture in a streaming way on Youtube, Facebook and Twitch. The Quarantine Clash grand finale was on May 31st and the popular jury established as winner of the 2020 Editition Chiquidubs from Panama.

 

Interviewer: Eugenia Conti 

Songs (Promotional use only)

Watch out for this – Major Lazer

Que Calor – Major Lazer

Video directed by Drummstudio Salento

“Gege Vibes Streaming Show #2” features Interviews with Julian Marley, Bamm Holt and Gmac.

 

“Gege Vibes Streaming show” is the new Gege Vibes Magazine‘s format available on Youtube. The purpose is to keep our press contents up during those hard time of Covid-19. Normally, we travel to realize video interviews with Artists after their shows, in Festivals, in studios or during their tours. Right now social distancing and quarantine not allow us to continue to work in this way, that’s why we have decided to introduce the “video calls interviews”. We believe that in this difficult period is very important to keep the positive vibes alive with home entertainment, good music and information.

The second chapter of “Gege Vibes Streaming Show” is fully dedicated to the cannabis world as long as it was recorded on 4/20/2020. We released some brand new interviews featuring recording Artists Julian Marley, Bamm Holt and Gmac.

Julian Marley talked about his last album “As I am”, the power of herb in those times of captivity for the humanity who is forced in quarantine because of the unnatural corona virus and many more. Bamm Holt, who is John Holt‘s grandson, originally from Jamaica but living in USA, told us about his love for reggae and hip-hop. He got skills in both of the musical genres. He also announced that soon will be out his tribute to John Holt called “1000 volts of Holt” together with his father Junior Holt. And on top of that, he is working to release his first solo album as well. Gmac, real name Garfield Mclean, answered our call from his city Kingston and explained us how we have to handle this quarantine as an opportunity to reflect on ourselves and connect with the divine spirit. Basically he suggested us to invest this free time in the best way possible. He also talked about his upcoming album “The legend” produced by the Italian label Morelove Music. In the episode we got some extra special credits. We featured as song premiere of this month “Weed Plan” singed by the historical jamaican artist Mykal Rose, produced by Young Pow Productions and distributed by Ghetto Youths Intl.

Ultimately, we gave a space for the dancers featuring the Italian DHQ from Salento Aurora Rah, who showed us two personal choreographies dancing on Masicka music.

Songs credits (promotional use)
Weed plan – Mykal Rose (Young Pow Prod.)
Energy – Masicka (Genahsyde Prod.)
Ice cream truck – Masicka (1Syde / Mozeeko Records)
Love your life – Gmac (Social Club Riddim – Morelove Music)
Crime – Gmac (StartMeUp Riddim – Morelove Music

Video Directed by Drummstudio

Article and interviews by Eugenia Conti

Interview with Tanya Stephens during Jamaica Music Conference Summit in Italy

We met Tanya Stephens in Lecce after the first “Jamaica Music Conference” summit in Italy. The international recording Artist has retraced her career of over twenty years with us. She expressed her satisfaction on seeing a lot of new successful female singers. Tanya’s suggestions for the upcoming artists are to don’t be afraid to make music, to enjoy it because is a great job and they will have the opportunity to connect with a lot of souls around the Globe. Mrs. Stephens is currently planning to release a new album in the next few months.

Interviewer: Eugenia Conti Shooting: Joan Nanook Webley Editing: Drummstudio Special thanks: Jamaica Music Conference